Miami Green Homes


Outdoor BBQ Design Options For Your South Florida Home

area. 

What is a freestanding BBQ?

A freestanding BBQ is a unit that is not attached to any structure. They can be operated using either propane tanks or charcoal. Many of these have wheels, so they can be moved around easily and stored away when not in use. For smaller areas, these units are ideal. They can be situated just about anywhere for outdoor use and do not depend on the architecture of a home to determine their placement. 

Freestanding BBQs come in different sizes and price ranges, offering everything from a basic grill to features such as side burners, smokers, dual fuel (charcoal and gas), etc. A BBQ should be chosen based on the amount of use it will receive, what sorts of foods will be cooked on it, and cooking preference—charcoal fire or gas. 

What is a built-in BBQ?

A built-in BBQ is incorporated into a structure, whether the home’s exterior wall or a separate outdoor living area. Most built-in BBQs are “hard-plumbed” into the home’s existing gas system for convenience, eliminating the need for tank changes.

The architecture of a home dictates how easily this can be accomplished and may require the help of a professional architect to ensure an aesthetic and code-compliant addition. 

As with freestanding BBQs, a built-in can be as simple as a charcoal pit with a grill. These are convenient if used infrequently, or the homeowners prefer the stronger smoky taste charcoal imparts.

For those looking for precision in their grilling or ease of cleaning, gas units are available with various options and levels of complexity. 

Patio shade covering options

In the hot Florida sun, patio coverings are essential to get the most out of outdoor spaces. The shade provided by a well-placed covering can increase the number of hours every day spent outdoors, depending on factors such as existing tree cover and directional exposure. A patio on the north side of a home will receive more shade cast by the house than on the western side. Believe it or not, even the insulation built into the house’s walls can help determine the outdoor temperature next to the home. 

What types of patio coverings are available for a BBQ area?

Luckily, there are patio shade coverings to fit every budget. Which cover is chosen will depend on the amount of shade needed and other factors such as neighborhood covenants, the home’s existing architecture, and the primary function of the outdoor space.

These options include pergolas, awnings, canopies, thatched roofs, and solar screens. Each of these has advantages and can add to the functionality of an outdoor space. 

Ready to start your own project? Contact Sebastian Eilert Architecture for your Architectural and Interior Design project needs.

http://www.SebastianEilert.com

Sebastian@SebastianEilert.com

786.556.3118

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Sebastian Eilert, AUA featured on Aia Miami

Featured on the AIA Miami Instagram account. @aiamiami

It has been a privilege to be a member of the community for over 20 years and contribute to its improvement, especially it’s sustainable advancement.

www.instagram.com/p/Cdn0x0CLzco/



Florida’s Place in Smart Design and Sustainable Architecture 

Sustainable “green” building and the integration of smart designs into architecture and homes have both gained momentum since the creation of LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification in the early 1990s

Globally, there are more than 500,000 LEED-certified residential homes, including single-family, multifamily and affordable housing units. Out of these, 400,000 are located in the USA, showing the importance of the nation’s efforts to lead the world’s sustainable architecture with residential design and new builds. 

In 2020 alone, over 24,000 residential units and 4,700 commercial projects were given LEED certification globally, with over 1,100 of those buildings being constructed in the USA. This trend of combining smart design into new builds and homes also continues to grow in Miami, Orlando, Tampa and throughout North, Central and South Florida.

The LEED Rating System 

At its core, the LEED rating system encourages architects and builders to use sustainable building materials and smart designs in new builds that protect the environment while improving the lives of people who use these buildings. 

LEED-certified homes and buildings might focus on micro-living, use less water and electricity, have a lower carbon footprint, be made from sustainable materials and be designed for better accessibility for people with disabilities. The overarching goal of LEED certification is to create spaces that support health and wellbeing. 

Buildings awarded LEED certification are designed to: 

  • Reduce the amount of waste associated with the building.
  • Lower the building’s overall costs.
  • Conserve water and energy.
  • Reduce harmful emissions.

The Top States for LEED-Certified Buildings 

According to the USGBC (US Green Building Council), Florida has done well in supporting LEED construction projects all over the state, from North to South Florida. In 2018, Florida had the eighth-highest number of LEED-certified buildings based on square footage.

California took first place for that year with a total of 768,940,808 square feet, while Florida had 154,686,673 square feet. The following year, Florida fell off the LEED Top 10 list for square footage. However, by 2020, the state had stayed in the top 10 at number four for the total number of LEED credential holders, behind California, New York and Texas. These talented professionals of Florida include some of the best builders, designers and architects around. 

Having a large pool of industry professionals in the state who are maintaining their LEED certifications gives hope for the future of sustainable architecture, residential design and green new builds in Florida. It also puts the right professionals within arm’s reach of any local Floridians considering new residential builds or micro-living and who want to combine smart design and sustainable architecture into future homes and residential designs. 

LEED Projects in Florida 

Even though Florida has fallen off the USGBC Top 10 list in recent years, there are still some inspiring projects and homes with smart design in mind that have been constructed recently. The cities of TallahasseeOrlando and Tampa have each been awarded Gold LEED certification, as well as Miami Beach in South Florida in July 2021. This certification highlights each city’s focus on combining sustainability, resilience and inclusion into key aspects of city planning, housing, transportation and workforce development. 

Two of the great residential projects in South Florida include: 

•            Live Oak House in St. Augustine

This residential design in St. Augustine received Platinum LEED certification in 2017 thanks to its energy-efficient smart design principles. The architect of this house designed it for improved airflow in a North/South direction to naturally combat hot temperatures, while making it out of locally-sourced materials. The architect of this residential property also included passive solar lighting and low volatile organic compound (VOC) paints, adhesives and sealants. Live Oak House has since been awarded the Florida Water Star Gold certificate for its conservative water consumption. 

•            GaiaMa Residence in Biscayne Park, Miami, South Florida

The GaiaMa Residence is one of the creations of South Florida architect Sebastian Eilert. This residential building in Miami has been awarded LEED Platinum certification, the highest of all LEED ratings. This is thanks to the incorporation of micro-living with smart design, which maximizes space and energy efficiency. Its ICF (Insulating Concrete Walls) and insuldeck roofing provide enhanced insulation, resulting in a -4 HERS rating, which proves this home is four percent more efficient than a net-zero home.

The Benefits of Green Building and Sustainable Architecture 

According to the Environment and Energy Study Institute (EESI), homes and other new builds account for around 40 percent of global energy-related CO2, highlighting the importance of integrating sustainable practices into the industry. 

Keeping this fact in mind, the USGBC has outlined some of the core benefits of green building that don’t only focus on reducing carbon footprints. They include: 

  • Constructing buildings that are profitable, cost-effective and good for the economy on a local and national level.
  • Prioritizing people’s health and wellbeing by improving indoor air and water quality and encouraging collaboration between residents and property owners to meet residents’ needs.
  • Providing an environmental solution that reduces carbon, water and energy waste while producing less waste during construction and through the life of the building.

As the world moves into the future, Florida continues to make strides in sustainable architecture and design that shape how entire cities in the state are planned. As a member of the USGBC, Sebastian Eilert Architecture is one of the industry-leading companies bringing about this sustainable change to South Florida’s architecture and design industry.  

To get one of South Florida’s most experienced sustainable architects working on your next project, click here to visit Eilert’s website and explore his previous projects in and around the Miami area and throughout the state.



Existing home sales rise in November

Existing home sales rose 1.9% to a seasonally adjusted 6.46 million million units in November from a month earlier, according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR).
— Read on finance.yahoo.com/news/existing-home-sales-november-2021-150006550.html

Find Miami Dade data HERE



5 Desired Home Features That Help Sell Homes FAST

When a potential buyer enters your house and sees many of features they want in their next home, you are on your way to making a sale.  Not only that, but buyers usually have some idea of what it would cost them to add these features to the home. So if your home already has these features, their offer will usually be made quickly and also be close to, or even over, the listed sales price.

Feature #1: Gourmet Kitchen

Today, the kitchen is the heart of the home. And you don’t have to be a master chef to appreciate a well-appointed kitchen, with top of the line appliances, open shelving, a large island with additional seating, and multiple sinks. Food preparation is no longer considered to be a kitchen’s only function. The kitchen has also become an entertaining space where friends can gather and converse while the meal is being prepared.  If a buyer doesn’t like the kitchen, he or she will probably pass on the house.

Feature #2: Home Theater/Media Room

Today’s tech-savvy buyers are interested in their next new home having a home theater/media room. This is a feature that becoming more and more common and more sough after. A home that includes a media room or home theater has a distinct edge on their competition and has a higher perceived value to potential buyers. A well-built media room should include an A/V receiver, a projector and theater screen, a speaker system, and a streaming media player.

Feature #3: Home Office

Because more and more people are working either full or part time from home these days, a dedicated home office has become increasingly sought after. This room should have natural lighting and doors that can be closed to stop interruptions caused by every day family life happening in the rest of the home. Besides a comfy office chair and desk, a home office should have additional seating that is comfortable and a high quality lamp or two to facilitate reading documents or looking at computer screens.

Feature #4: Smart Home Technology

Convenience is the name of the game. As the world becomes busier and busier, convenience grows in importance, especially to the tech-savvy homebuyer. These buyers are looking for everything from smart thermostats, to video doorbells, to smart kitchen appliances, to smart door locks, to even having window shades that can be controlled from their smartphones. It’s no longer “home sweet home”, it’s now “home smart home”.

Feature #5: Outdoor Living Space

Few things disappoint a homebuyer more than a lack of outdoor living space, some place where they can entertain family and friends. Whether this space is a deck (decks constructed with composite materials are preferred) or a patio doesn’t really matter. It’s just important that the space is there.

The whole idea here is to get your home listed for sale, get it sold and off the market quickly, while putting as much extra money as possible into your pocket. It’s important to understand what today’s homebuyers are seeking in their next new home.



Hurricane Names For the 2021 Season – Frozen anyone?

What does Disney’s Frozen have to with the Atlantic Hurricane Season in 2021? We shall find out… below is the name list.

Learn how hurricanes are named, and see the names for the 2021 season. Did your name make the list?
— Read on www.farmersalmanac.com/hurricane-names-31223

  1. Ana
  2. Bill 
  3. Claudette 
  4. Danny
  5. Elsa
  6. Fred
  7. Grace
  8. Henri
  9. Ida
  10. Julian
  11. Kate
  12. Larry
  13. Mindy
  14. Nicholas
  15. Odette
  16. Peter
  17. Rose
  18. Sam
  19. Teresa
  20. Victor
  21. Wanda


Sebastian Eilert Architecture named along top 10 “Miami Architects” best

Honored to be among this select group of Miami’s finest 10 architects. Sebastian Eilert Architecture selected by Miami Architects.

Full list HERE



Design after COVID 19. How the virus may affect architectural design for the home, Part I

There is no doubt that the “after” will bring with it some changes and lasting adjustments. After looking at how the office and office culture are likely affected, what do changes to the home may look like?

In the home – Part I:

“Shelter in place” and “remote work from home” are certainly familiar terms these days. But how does this cozy space need to change to continue to be the safe haven we all seek? The answer is linked to our daily use of familiar areas and activities.

Let’s start with the approach. Coming from the outside world; work, shopping, exercise, etc. into the home in South Florida its likely done by car. If you are lucky to have a garage, that will be the point of first contact. Otherwise, the front door will serve as this space. Technology is already widely available to assist with remote unlocking and opening, so the touchless entry is already safe and will likely expand into a standard feature. Materials used for hardware will also change to reflect easy cleaning and disinfecting. More apps are likely to make the transition from the approach into the house easy, sensor-based, and even remote.

The next space is the actual entrance. South Florida rarely features a true foyer as commonly found in northern regions. The main reason for this architecturally speaking is the lack of need to keep the cold out and shed all clothing relating to severe or unpleasant weather. This too will change by design. No longer concerned only with air condition leaking to the outside, the entrance vestibule or foyer will find its way into the updated post COVIT-19 designed home. This can be new or retrofit to create the buffer needed to bring items from the outside into the home and transition out of protective clothing as well as provide a first layer for viral shedding and reduced transmittal of possible contaminants. Doormats, filters, and UV cabinets for certain clothing may look futuristic but are likely to be integrated here with new materials and will take up some of this space.

mudroom

Mudroom transition from the garage into the house.

In more spacious homes this room may also be added as an interface between the garage and the house. Already a popular feature in new home design, the mud-room – a transitional space between garage and kitchen or pantry – no longer will be used for backpacks, school supplies, and large shopping trips only. It will now include a disinfection station and for front line workers, may include a disposable section, similar to a sharps or biohazard removal container setup.

Once inside the home, personal interactions will also be guided by hands-free decisions and upgrades. Appliances, light control, sound systems, faucets, showers, etc., are already integrating these features. More is sure to come, combing voice and motion activation. Think about your favorite Spaceship Enterprise stage setup…

Rain Shower Set System 20" x 14" with Touch Panel Smart Mixer and Remote Controlled LED - VAVALA Vavala FLUXURIE.COM

Free access – modern voice-command controlled shower

Lounging in the living area, working in the designated home station (look for part II B on more for this feature), or getting the well-deserved shut-eye are areas of personal use that should not change a great deal from current design preferences. The 2 most impacted areas are the bathroom and the kitchen. Following a typical daily routine, the first step once rolling out of bed, having told the alarm to stop ringing, would be the use of the toilet. Touch unavoidable by sitting down, but “clean-up” is changing. Besides the paranoia of purchasing toilet paper, there is no real need for this ancient relic in the post COVIT design. Paperless cleansing toilet seats do not just eliminate the need for paper, but will also reduce the need for touch; flushing voice active as well.

Touchless Toilet Seat Covers : Toilet Seat covers

The bathroom sink will also be touchless or voice-activated and will likely include some UV lighting to further incorporate disinfecting. This is more important upon the noted return to the home above, but will become a standard feature in the near future. Next is the shower, again simple already in place solutions for turning on/off, regulating temperature and pressure. Accessibility is likely to be the big winner not just though incorporating commands, but also by the increase in space to avoid tight areas more likely to touch someone or something, think shower curtains, versus a nice roll-in shower.

IMG_0628

Doorless shower access. Enlarged shower for easy access

On to the kitchen: The kitchen counter is already typically a biohazard, no matter how well it is maintained. We use it daily and materials will change to be both user friendly and sanitary. Microbial cutting surfaces and disinfectant under cabinet light are good choices. The fridge, appliances, and cooktops all will be retrofitted with voice commands and contribute to the touchless function of the kitchen space. Eating will hopefully still be manual !

10 Best Under Cabinet LED Lighting - (2020 Reviews & Guide)

With this increase in technology, reliable power and data will become paramount. An increased energy demand can be offset with photovoltaic systems and supported by other renewable energy resources. A designated server space will also find its way int the post COVID designed home, maybe with a pantry or otherwise near the kitchen for easy access.

With so many integrated features to make one s life better, how do we now interact with others inside the home? Look for part II about the family group, friends and family visiting, and the work at home environment.

Sebastian Eilert, AIA

PS: Side note about the daily routine. A great read I found is “A Million Years In A Day” by Greg Jenner, following the history of many of the daily routines and chores done in the home.



There Goes The Neighborhood: Miami – Part 2 (From The Stakes) | WLRN

The fear of mass displacement isn’t paranoia for black people in Liberty City. It’s family history. WLRN and WYNC studios present the second episode of a
— Read on www.wlrn.org/post/there-goes-neighborhood-miami-part-2-stakes



Climate Gentrification – study applied to Miami – Interesting podcast. There Goes the Neighborhood: Miami—Part 1 (from The Stakes) | WLRN

First of 3 parts looking at the concept of climate gentrification in Miami. Does seawater change where future developments will happen? Taking over high ground LIttle Haiti and Liberty City for future developments may suggest that it is a real consideration.

Listen to the podcast through WLRN.

The sea level is rising–and so is the rent.  WLRN and WYNC studios present the first episode of a three part series on climate gentrification.
— Read on http://www.wlrn.org/post/there-goes-neighborhood-miami-part-1-stakes