Miami Green Homes


There Goes The Neighborhood: Miami – Part 2 (From The Stakes) | WLRN

The fear of mass displacement isn’t paranoia for black people in Liberty City. It’s family history. WLRN and WYNC studios present the second episode of a
— Read on www.wlrn.org/post/there-goes-neighborhood-miami-part-2-stakes



Climate Gentrification – study applied to Miami – Interesting podcast. There Goes the Neighborhood: Miami—Part 1 (from The Stakes) | WLRN

First of 3 parts looking at the concept of climate gentrification in Miami. Does seawater change where future developments will happen? Taking over high ground LIttle Haiti and Liberty City for future developments may suggest that it is a real consideration.

Listen to the podcast through WLRN.

The sea level is rising–and so is the rent.  WLRN and WYNC studios present the first episode of a three part series on climate gentrification.
— Read on http://www.wlrn.org/post/there-goes-neighborhood-miami-part-1-stakes



These Sustainable Hotels Are Doing Good for Their Communities–and the World | AFAR

6 ways that hotels across the globe are investing in sustainable practices and making the world better, one step at a time.
— Read on www.afar.com/magazine/6-ways-hotels-around-the-world-are-working-to-become-more-sustainable

Sustainable architecture on the list! An important element for any “place”



The Role(s) of the Architects – what we really do

 

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Let’s keep the role and influence of the individual architect a little reasonable and in perspective here. There are so many varying aspects of architecture employment. Few actually design, especially design all the time. Most are executing some sort construction documents or other legal text relevant to the building at hand, research materials or local building and zoning code. When design actually happens, it is a very rewarding for most. So design, as conceived as the main role of the architect by the public, is in fact a rather small aspect of the overall practice.

In general the role of the licensed architect, is to orchestrate a number of parts required for the project into a coherent fashion to the success of said project. Like the CEO of a company, the architect is the leader of the project. This holds true during the planning and design phases, and shifts during the actual construction phase. Here the architect takes an observatory role, rather than a leading role within the project team.

What are the typical parts of a design team? Every project is a little different, but most include the owner, the client, a group of engineers and the staff of the architect itself.

Beyond leading the above noted project, there are many roles within an architectural practice. Like any business, staff relating to the legal operation, such as accounting, marketing, etc. are required but may be considered elsewhere. As for the actual architectural breakdown, here are key positions within an architectural firm. The big three are:

Draftsperson and production staff are generally operating software to literally produce the drawings that communicate the design intent and any details required for construction. This used to be hand drafting, but those days are long gone.  Largest portion of the architectural practice, consumes the most time.

Designer – coveted spot. Actually design the project. Most creative and theoretic aspect of architecture.

Project manager – little design, lots of production, lots of research and written texts. Overall understanding of project, contracts, coordination with others. Most engaging portion of the practice.



Voyage MIA article – meet Sebastian Eilert

Thank you to Voyage MIA for the feature of the day! Nice to meet you, too. 

http://voyagemia.com/interview/meet-sebastian-eilert-sebastian-eilert-architecture-south-dade-county/



Building information modeling, or BIM, is the newest generation of software used for design and creation of documents for architectural projects.

For thousands of years, architecture has been worked the same way. The tools have changed, from drawings on papyrus or chipped into stone, to drafting on velum and blueprints. The shift to CAD, computer aided design or drafting, was a major shift in the speed of production but doesn’t really change the way architects work. It was, and still is, essentially drawing on a two dimensional surface. It doesn’t matter if that surface is a sheet of paper or model space in a computer file.

What makes BIM different?

BIM is like building in a virtual environment. The property can be accurately modeled, with the topography recreated and the climate set as part of the information. This includes items such as humidity and temperature, solar information and elevation. The materials used can be accurately described, not only by size but with information that can include insulation values and life cycle costs as well. A CMU, concrete modular unit or concrete block, can be accurately dimensioned. A CMU is 7-5/8” x 7-5/8” x 15-5/8” in size. The drawing convention has been to use the nominal size of 8” to represent this. With BIM we can accurately model a wall with real dimensions which helps during construction as less assumptions must be made.

What can BIM do that CAD can’t?

Information is the most important aspect of BIM. The accuracy of design is much higher and more controllable. This doesn’t just include dimensions but material quantities as well. The content of a material such as cast in place concrete can be much more accurately estimated which can save on costs. The building energy uses can be extrapolated from the model to more accurately size AC equipment. This means equipment can be specified that isn’t too big or to small for the building. This information is not just useful to clients and architects but to contractors as well. They can more accurately price out a project because their material needs are more precisely known.

What are some of the issues with BIM?

The adoption of BIM by design professionals is very limited at this time. There are a few of reasons for this. The first one is the reluctance of established practitioners to make major changes to how they work. BIM is a paradigm shift in how architects design and is not an easy change to undertake. Another issue is once the decision to shift from CAD to BIM is made, the learning curve is very steep and long. It may take up to a year before a design team becomes proficient in the software. During this transition production time may actually be longer than before, however the benefits in the long term will be immense. Finding personnel who can use the software is also an issue. The people who know how to use the software don’t usually have the experience in construction to exploit it fully. Conversely experienced designers don’t know the program.

Our experience with BIM:

There have been two major advantages that we have benefitted from using BIM. The amount of time required for construction document production has been reduced significantly. Depending on the project, we have seen time savings of 50-90%. The accuracy of modeling has resulted in fewer construction revisions and RFI’s, requests for information. The most important change has been how we work with our clients. We deliver 3D models as part of the design process in addition to conventional plans. In many ways, we have found that clients, and in some cases engineers, have a better understanding of their project using the 3D model verses the plans. This allows us to have a very interactive design process and deliver a better project.

BIM has become the foundation for construction and as it is adopted more widely in the future by all members of the building team, will continue to be more useful in making design decisions.

 



Concrete foundation pour – in progress time lapse

Concrete pour for a large foundation/footing. Steel has been placed and inspected. 

Construction workers actually working! Jokes aside, you can see the setup to pour, the harmony between concrete truck driver and the workers, the vibrator machine to ensure that concrete is packed properly and the general smoothing and leveling of the top. Pretty good work! Pretty large footing.